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Turkana Boy Causes Museum Ruckus

first_imgChristians want the boy arrested and locked up.  Scientists want to put him on stage.  The stage is Kenya’s National Museum, and the boy is Turkana boy, a fossil classified by evolutionists as Homo erectus and claimed to be 1.6 million years old.  CNN reported that the museum is showcasing the fossil, the most complete hominid skeleton ever found, for the first time.  It will take center stage of a new exhibit on the theme of evolution.    The exhibit has caused protests from evangelical Christians in Kenya.  According to CNN, they have demanded the skeleton be relegated to a back room “along with some kind of notice saying evolution is not a fact but merely one of a number of theories.”  Bishop Boniface Adoyo, head of Kenya’s 35 evangelical denominations with 10 million constituents, protested that “I did not evolve from Turkana Boy or anything like it.  These sorts of silly views are killing our faith.”    Evolutionists are responding with equally entrenched positions.  “Whether the bishop likes it or not, Turkana Boy is a distant relation of his,” retorted Richard Leakey, discoverer of “Lucy” and founder of the museum’s prehistory department.  “The bishop is descended from the apes and these fossils tell how he evolved.”    The news item ends by claiming that the head of paleontology at the museum, Dr. Emma Mbua, is a Protestant who sees no problem with evolution.  “Evolution is a fact,” she said.  “Turkana Boy is our jewel.  For the first time, we will be taking him out of the strong room and showing our heritage to the world.”    Nevertheless, concerns over security have made the museum take out millions of dollars of insurance on the exhibit and protect it with a glass screen, closed circuit TV and security guards.  The museum gets about 100,000 visitors a year.    CNN says the museum renovation features additional hominid fossils and exhibits of extinct animals that “provide the clearest and unrivaled record yet of evolution and the origins of man,” according to unnamed scientists.  The $10.5 million renovation was paid for by the European Union.  By contrast, the entire Creation Museum being opened this year by Answers in Genesis, including property, buildings, and all exhibits, is $27 million.As usual, this story creates a false dichotomy between religion and science, between faith and knowledge.  We don’t have the complete story on Bishop Adoyo’s efforts, but have a suggestion on the way these sorts of disagreements should be handled.  Demanding that the exhibit be censored or relegated to a back room is counterproductive, because it reinforces the stereotype that Christians are afraid of hearing scientific evidence that contradicts their faith.    The shoe is really on the other foot.  Evolutionists want no debate, no public hearing on the evidence.  They want to promote a very sanitized, visualized, propagandized version of their Myth of the Mystical Tree (see 02/01/2007).  Bones exist – that’s the truth part.  Yes, there are skeletons of odd-looking humans, elephants and giraffes that have gone the way of all the world.  What do they mean?  That’s where if you don’t have all the facts on display, you can be misled (e.g., 08/09/2005)..    So let’s learn about Turkana Boy.  Actually, creationists have written up a lot about him and exposed some embarrassments the evolutionists aren’t telling you about.  Look, for instance, at the critiques of this fossil on CMI Creation Ministries Intl. (also this article), where you will learn that:The brain capacity of the skull is within the range of modern man.The height of the skeleton for its age is within the range of modern humans.This fossil shows that it is no longer possible to describe Homo erectus as a “large-brained pongid.”M. Wolpoff described the postcranium of this fossil as “mostly modern.”Wolpoff and Thorne cannot find any consistent anatomical markers which separate erectus from sapiens.The limb proportions resemble those of modern humans.The more robust bones of Homo erectus could be a reflection of routine heavy physical exertion than of primitive characteristics; if anything, thinner bones on modern humans seem a disadvantage.Opinions differ widely on the status of these and almost every other alleged human ancestor.Indeed, “To have such a tall erectus individual with a modern postcranium appear at such an early stage in the alleged evolutionary history of erectus is a problem for evolutionists,” CMI claims.  “If evolution was true, then a more intermediate postcranial skeleton would be expected, one reflecting more of a mid-way stage between the australopithecines and modern humans, not one already at the modern human stage.”    On top of that, Apologetics Press quotes Ian Tatersall (an evolutionist) saying that “the whole classification of Homo erectus has become a kind of dumping ground for strange and out-of-place fossils.”  Jeffrey Schwartz made the same complaint in the 07/03/2004 entry, calling the designation “mythical.”  Some taxonomists split hairs over whether this skeleton should be classified in another mythical group, Homo ergaster, when there is really no reason other than evolutionary presuppositions to consider them non-human (see also this article from A.P. and the 01/01/2005 entry here).  Brain size is no guarantee of an evolutionary sequence (see 08/05/2006).  Need we also remind our readers how many bitter fights there have been between evolutionary paleoanthropologists themselves about human evolution (e.g., 12/21/2004, 09/23/2004, 03/28/2003, 04/27/2006, 06/14/2006).  These fights, though entertaining, don’t matter because human evolution has already been falsified anyway (08/22/2005, 12/30/2004).    In other words, the evolutionists are hiding key parts of the story by exhibiting Turkana Boy as a primitive human ancestor.  They’re lying to the public!  A half truth can sometimes be more deceptive and dangerous than a big lie.  This is the basis on which Christians need to go on the offense with the Kenya museum charlatans.  They are spinning a myth around selective evidence.  We all have the same objective evidence to look at, but the evolutionists are avoiding the problems with their interpretations.  They are not being scientific (objective, rational, honest) about the issues!  This is an intellectual crime that deserves the approbation of the entire public, not just the evangelical Christians.To add insult to injury, Leakey committed a hate crime: “The bishop is descended from the apes,” he said.  How can Leakey, a white Englishman, get away with that kind of insult to a respectable African person of color?  Only against Christians is it possible to speak words of racism and bigotry.  But apart from that, let’s do a little logic here and turn Leakey’s statement back on himself.  Ask him, “Are you, Richard Leakey, a descendent of the apes too?”  He will have no choice but to answer yes.  Great; follow up with, “Then how can you know anything is true, including the proposition that you are descended from apes?    Drive the point home, because he has no answer.  “In a worldview of constant change and evolution, how can you have any assurance that there are unchanging truths beyond matter in motion?  In a world where fitness and survival are the highest virtues (whatever ‘virtue’ means), how can you prove to me you are not lying so as to defeat me in the fitness race?  How can you be sure of anything, even science, without first justifying the philosophical belief that human rationality connects with experience?”    So here’s our advice.  This is an important lesson for anyone having to deal with the Darwin propaganda, whether in museums, textbooks, or in the media.  Don’t whimper about how this exhibit is “killing our faith” (because that reinforces their stereotype about “people of faith” as opposed to “science”).  Don’t reinforce their prejudice that all criticisms of evolution are theologically motivated.  And obviously, don’t threaten violence (although there was no indication at all in the CNN article whether the fears of the museum staff were grounded in anything but their own guilty consciences).  Instead, appeal to the honesty and intellectual integrity of the scientists and museum staff.  Convince them that they are not being honest and scientifically sound to hide the incriminating evidence and alternative views on Turkana Boy.  Show them the quotes by Wolpoff and Tatersall and other evolutionists who dispute the views about this and other fossils.  Should only one view among evolutionists be presented, let alone the views of critics of evolution?  Why should this contrary scientific evidence be hidden from the public?  We don’t want to relegate Turkana Boy and other evidence to the back room; we want to bring all the evidence the evolutionists are hiding in the back room and take it up front into the light.  We want to make it part of the showcase!  Along with balanced evidence, let’s bring out a few more things from Darwin’s back room to put on display:An exhibit on how Piltdown Man fooled the entire evolutionary scientific community for 40 years.A wastebin filled with all the bones once thought to represent human ancestors.A reminder of how evolutionists exhibited Ota Benga, an African pygmy, in a zoo.A copy of Ernst Haeckl’s racist chart of how blacks were closer to Apes than to European whites.A description of how the iconic “descent of man” chart perpetuates the myth of progress.A list of cusswords that disagreeing paleoanthropologists have called each other.A chart of the warring groups of paleoanthropologists and their tactics of ruining each other’s reputations.An exhibit on the dark history of eugenics.An illustration of all the massacres and genocides committed in the name of evolutionary racism: say, a pile of marbles with each marble representing a human life quenched by Darwinist dictatorships.  How high would a tower of 148 million marbles reach?For the kids, you could have replicas of modern human skulls from around the world and see if they can arrange them into an evolutionary sequence.  As a second exercise, see if they can sort them into human and non-human bins.  Throw in some skulls deformed by disease or post-burial stresses to trip them up.  After they are convinced they have an evolutionary tree, show them pictures of the modern people groups they represent.  Describe the languages, cultures and philosophies of the intelligent persons they just assumed were primitive ancestors.  As a third game, see if they can similarly organize garage tools or toy cars into an evolutionary phylogeny as a lesson on how similarities do not necessarily prove ancestral relationships.  For adults, how about some scholarly lectures on philosophy of science?  Questions could be discussed about the ability of finite human minds to interpret unseen past events, especially if human brains are assumed to be products of unguided material processes.  Describe how the same data can be reinterpreted in other ways without the Darwinian worldview.    Left to themselves, the Darwinists will turn the Kenya museum into a whitewashed sepulcher, beautiful on the outside, but on the inside full of dead men’s bones and all uncleanness of ideas.  Evangelicals should be in favor of turning on the lights and letting in fresh air.  Give the public all the facts and let them use their minds to decide who has the best case.  That’s fair.  That’s honest.  And that’s exactly what the evolutionists do NOT want (see 02/27/2006).  The Kenya museum should be a well-rounded, thought-provoking center of ideas and concepts on these important issues instead of a Darwinist shrine.  Help them out, evangelicals.  Get the dirty laundry on display instead of starched and bleached and ironed white shirts.  Tell them you want to teach more about Darwinism than the Darwinists dare to reveal.  If they resist, smile and remind them that honesty is the best policy.  Watch them squirm over that proverb.    To pursue this kind of winning strategy will require study.  You have to research the facts and know the best arguments on both sides.  But in the end, it will pay off: it will demonstrate to all the world that the real censors, the real people of frothy faith, are the Mbuas and Leakeys and other dogmatists who shout “evolution is a fact!”  A little study of these pages will provide many examples of Darwin-worshippers trying to shove their religion down the throats of the public without debate.  The Master Strategist advised his followers, “Be wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.”  This implies that the other side is the converse.(Visited 40 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Collecting soybean carry

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLCCorn and beans rallied last week because rain swept through the Midwest slowing harvest. In select areas where harvest is behind, processors are bidding up for grain. It’s unlikely these basis bumps will last long, but some lucky farmers who managed to harvest some grain early could benefit.The slow harvest progress may help corn from sliding all the way back to lows from two weeks ago. I doubt beans will be as lucky. There are just too many in the fields and as they get harvested it could be too much for the market to deal with. Collecting bean carryOn 8/30 the November to July bean spread was a 49-cent premium. With all of my bean sales hedged against November futures, I was concerned about the current low basis levels. Since I can store all of my 2018 harvested beans and I have all of my beans sold, I moved my sales forward to capture the 49-cent carry. I did this by buying back my November beans futures and immediately sold July bean futures for 49 cent higher.As always, as long as the crop is sold, the price level of the bean futures trades doesn’t matter. Only the spread value matters when collecting the carry because the sales are still in place. What does it cost to hold the beans in the bin that long?Since I could sell the beans immediately at harvest, there is a cost to hold grain and not pay down my operation note. That 49 cents enables me to collect 6.125 cents per month until summer when basis levels may be better (49 cents per 8 months of holding from November-July).Assuming a $7.50 per bushel cash value in southeast Nebraska this week and a 6% operating note, it costs me 3.75 cents per month to hold the grain in the bin. With the 6.125 cents carry premium, I’m actually making a guaranteed 2.375 cents per month on the carry to hold the beans (6.125 carry premium – 3.75 loan interest). That would mean I can guarantee myself 19 cents of actual profit to hold the beans until summer. What about basis risk?Basis could get worse if the crop is bigger than estimated and futures have a large rally and trade issues don’t improve. So, I still have basis risk. Another contributing factor is the upcoming South American growing year. While a crop failure may cause a futures price spike, it doesn’t guarantee a basis rally. How China, who consumes 60% of the world’s beans, would handle any bean shortages from South America during this trade war becomes a big factor. If the trade issues remain unresolved well past the election and China refuses to accept U.S. bean imports, basis values may go down further.That’s a lot of unknowns that are impossible to predict. While I know I have risk with the basis I’m going to instead look at historical trends for the basis in my area. Those trends support the notion that bean basis usually improves after harvest. If that happens, my bean profits will also increase. The importance of separating futures, market carry and basisCollecting market carry is one of the least risky ways to guarantee additional profits for my farm operation from storing grain. While I didn’t set the basis in the example above, I could have set basis in July for the same levels as current harvest delivery, which would have guaranteed me those 19 cents of profits. Historically, it’s been more advantageous to wait until further in the future to set the basis, so I made the decision to wait on setting a basis or even picking a location that I will sell cash beans to. That is why I continue to keep my sales in place using July futures.In hindsight I’m very glad I sold 100% of anticipated 2018 bean production last February when November futures were $10. With what I know today, that was a good decision. I’m also pleased I was able to add the additional 49 cents of market carry to my sale price too. At the time of the trade above that had been the highest carry I’ve seen in the bean market in the last 10 years.The example above illustrates why it’s so important to look at the futures price, market carry and basis separately within a grain marketing strategy. These factors move independently of each other, and if considered separately, it’s possible to maximize the potential opportunity within each one, offering the best farm operation profit potential. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at [email protected]last_img read more

Showing at the Ohio State Fair is about the experience

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseBanners are nice. Success is great. But really, at the end of each Ohio State Fair, it is really about the experience, lessons learned and the people. Though Caroline Winter from Pickaway County has had some success in showmanship and breed shows, those are not the first things she shares about what she loves about the Ohio State Fair.“I have been showing since I could walk. I love hanging out with my friends who are also my competitors,” the 17-year-old said. “In the show ring we compete, but if my friend beats me, I don’t hold it against them. Whatever happens in the show ring, we go get ice cream or play a game of cards — a very competitive game of cards.“Spoons is my favorite card game at the State Fair. We’ll get a big game going and it is a lot of fun. And, for the ice cream, you have to go at the right time because if you don’t the line is wrapping around the building. I go after I show to get a nice treat, cool off and look at the butter cow.”The fun at the Ohio State Fair is the culmination of months of long hours and dedication — something many fairgoers do not always understand.“I love how there are all sorts of different people with all sorts of different backgrounds who come to watch the show. They ask questions and I love talking with them about the cattle,” Caroline said. “A lot of people look forward to seeing the animals and learning about them. I love to talk about the daily care that goes into the animals and what it takes to show them and how much food they actually eat. It is fun talking to them about the animals. I like explaining what I do and why I do it. And yes, they do poop and I do have to clean it up.”This year Caroline (with some help from her older sister Christina) will have three Angus heifers, a Shorthorn cow calf pair, a Shorthorn calf, an Angus steer, a ShorthornPlus steer, and a Maintainer steer at the Ohio State Fair. Many hours go into the care of the cattle leading up to the State Fair but Caroline also has a long set of duties on her family’s crop farm and she trains for fall cross-country in her spare time.“In the mornings in the summer I start with feeding the cattle and getting them in the barn. We rinse every day. When my dad gets home we help with hay, planting, working ground, and harvesting in the fall,” she said. “In the winter we clean the barn and feed a lot of hay. We have a corn-wheat-soybean rotation with another 80 acres of hay — small square bales and big round bales. I help with hay all summer and I am always working with the cattle.”There is plenty of work to be done with the cattle while they are at the State Fair, but in comparison to the normal summer schedule for Caroline, the event is like a vacation.“With the breeding show during the first part of the State Fair, we are in and out so quickly there is not much extra time. But I like the people there, especially in the Shorthorn Breeders Association. They are so nice and friendly. They love their card games and they give out popsicles,” Caroline said. “With the market show later in the Fair, I only have three animals so I can relax a little more. When we are up at the State Fair with the market steers, it is like a vacation away from home and I am able to hang out with my friends and relax. There is way less to take care of compared to the Pickaway County Fair where I had two market steers, a feeder calf, two market lambs, a breeding ewe, and a market hog. Then I went right from county fair to the Shorthorn Junior Nationals in Tennessee. At the county fair or when I’m at home, I have something going on every day.”Of all the species Caroline shows, the cattle are her favorite, which makes her State Fair experience even more special.“With the sheep or pigs, I only have a few months with them. With the cattle, I am working with them year round. You can really see the difference with them starting to trust you and you get this bond with them as they get used to you. Nugget is my Shorthorn cow I’m taking to State Fair. We have gone to many shows together,” Caroline said. “We did the BEST program and other state fairs. Before she had her baby we’d go out here in the lot and play tag. I’d sprint through the pasture and she’d run after me. In the stalls at shows I lay down beside her with my back at the front of the stall and she will lay her head right on me.”Her favorite part of competing with the cattle is showmanship.“I like showmanship. It doesn’t matter how good your animal is,” she said. “It is about how well you can present your animal. The judge is mainly focused on you and I like to show how well I can present my animal.”Caroline will have the unique opportunity to share her showmanship expertise and excitement for the fair this year as a part of the inaugural Dean’s Charity Steer Show on July 30 at 2:00 p.m. in the Voinovich Building. For the event, celebrity exhibitors — including some who never set foot in a show ring — will be paired with Ohio 4-H members to try their hand at showing a steer and vying for the judge’s eye. Donors can support each celebrity involved and proceeds go to the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Ohio.Caroline will be assisting Matt Barnes, a Columbus News anchor for NBC4 Today, as he makes his initial trip into the show ring to wrangle a steer.“Bill Tom from the Ohio State Fair came to me and asked if I wanted to do this at Beef Expo because I have exhibited for so long. I wanted to do this to return the favor of everyone who has helped me. And I know it is going to a really good cause. I actually know some families who have used the Ronald McDonald House. And it sounded fun,” Caroline said. “I always like teaching people about showing cattle and this gives me another chance to do that. Matt Barnes came down to our county fair to watch me get the steers ready for the show and then watched me show them. He asked some questions about the steers and did a short interview. He has no background with steers. I told him, you have to just relax.Columbus morning television anchorman Matt Barnes came to the Winter farm to practice his showmanship skills before the Dean’s Charity Steer Show. Photo provided by the Winter family.“If you get worked up, the steer will get worked up, so you have to be comfortable with them. Once he gets comfortable we’ll lead the steer around some and get the feet set a few times to practice. Then we’ll work on some more of the details. Matt seems pretty excited about it. He asked me if I’ve ever taught someone in one day before. I think he seems very willing to try. If he tries and gives his best effort then he will do pretty well.”Caroline is really looking forward to the event and the Ohio State Fair as a whole. She is hoping to celebrate some State Fair success with some cold, chocolate ice cream from the dairy building. And, like every exhibitor at the fair, she would love a new banner to hang in the barn, but Caroline knows the experience, lessons learned and the people make every year a success at the Ohio State Fair no matter what the outcome in the show ring.To find out more about the Dean’s Charity Steer Show and make a donation today at cfaes.osu.edu/deanscharitysteershow.Long months of hard work are an important part of taking competitive cattle to show at the Ohio State Fair.last_img read more

This Heat Pump Problem Is a Surprisingly Common Cause for High Electricity Bills

first_img Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, energy consultant, RESNET-certified trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. The electric resistance element is on all summerHis next step was to turn off the breaker to the electric resistance heat (a.k.a. strip heat) in the HVAC system. This is basically a giant toaster inside the air handler. Heat pumps use it for supplemental heat. In some homes, it’s used as the primary heat source. It’s not cheap, though, especially considering that the same electricity going into a heat pump will yield two or three times more heat.Anyway, the utility investigator turned off the breaker to the strip heat and watched what happened to the meter. In the summer time, turning off the strip heat should have no effect at all on how fast the meter spins because it shouldn’t be running. Strip heat is for cold weather.In this case, the meter went from spinning fast enough to saw wood to moving as slow as a horned passalus (photo below) going for a walk in the woods.“Well, we found your problem, ma’am,” he told her. “Your heating and cooling system was doing both at the same time, making you spend a lot of money to stay uncomfortable.” She lives in a small, simple house in southern Mississippi. It’s only 1,700 square feet. Why then, she wondered, were her summer electricity bills running more than $600?The house didn’t have any energy-hog features like a swimming pool, and she didn’t do stupid things like leave all the doors and windows open while she ran the air conditioner. What could it be?She called her electric company, one of the co-ops in Mississippi, and they sent someone out to investigate. Utility companies get calls like this all the time, and they’ve learned from experience what most of the main causes of high bills are. When the utility investigator arrived at the house, he asked her to tell him anything she knew that might help him.“Well,” she said, “the air conditioner runs all the time, but the house won’t even cool down to 80 degrees.”“Ah, that helps to narrow it down a bit.” He went to work, and it didn’t take him long to find the problem. He measured the temperature drop across the air conditioner coil and found that the air on the ‘cool’ side wasn’t much lower than the air on the warm side. And both were much warmer than they should be.OK, that could be a disconnected duct in the attic, he thought. A look in the attic, however, showed that wasn’t the case here. Besides, a disconnected duct would increase the bill, but it almost certainly wouldn’t quadruple it.center_img Thermostat wiring errorsThis problem often results from a thermostat wired incorrectly so that the system kicks on the strip heat when it shouldn’t. Since anyone can go down to the home improvement store or the Interwebs and buy a thermostat, a good number of these problems result from DIY jobs.It seems crazy to think that someone wouldn’t notice that the heat is running in their home in summer, but they don’t feel heat coming out of the vents. That heat gets mixed with the cool air from the air conditioner. They cancel each other out, both using even more energy because they’re fighting each other.Got high electricity bills in summer that you don’t understand? Check your strip heat.last_img read more

Nadal beats Ferrer to Reach Barcelona Open Quarterfinals

first_imgBARCELONA, Spain — Rafael Nadal looked closer to his clay-court best again as he beat David Ferrer 6-3, 6-3 on Thursday to reach the quarterfinals of the Barcelona Open.The 11-time Barcelona champion saved four of five break points and broke four times in what could have been his last meeting with Ferrer, who is retiring after the Madrid Open next month. It was a sign of improvement for Nadal, who lost in the semifinals in Monte Carlo last week and then needed three sets to get past Leonard Mayer in his opening match in Barcelona.“This match was important for me,” Nadal said. “Yesterday I had a tough match. I took a step forward and was able to play with more energy.”The top-seeded Nadal will next face either Stefanos Tsitsipas, last year’s runner-up, or Jan-Lennard Struff.Nadal was up 5-3 in the first set before play was stopped for a rain delay. He continued to dictate the match when play resumed, serving out the set and breaking Ferrer’s next service game.Ferrer saved three match points before finally sending a forehand into the net to give Nadal the win.The 37-year-old Ferrer was making his last appearance at the Barcelona Open and could not hold back the tears when he received an ovation from the audience. He placed his pink headband on the court as a mark that he had played his last match here.“I am happy to be able to finish this tournament on the center court, playing against Nadal. I gave it my all,” Ferrer said.Also, third-seeded Dominic Thiem broke Jaume Munar five times to earn a 7-5, 6-1 victory. Fourth-seeded Kei Nishikori, who won the tournament in 2014 and 2015, brushed off Felix Auger-Aliassime 6-1, 6-3.Grigor Dimitrov was beaten 2-6, 6-4, 7-6 (2) by Nicolas Jarry, who will meet Daniil Medvedev after he beat American Mackenzie McDonald 6-3, 6-2.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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