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Vulnerabilities show in Houston Astros’ rout of A’s

first_imgEvery ball a Houston Astros batter knocked out of Minute Maid park is met with a symphony of fireworks, train whistles and echoed cheers. That symphony turned into a raucous cacophony throughout Homer Bailey’s short-lived second start for the Oakland A’s, culminating in a 11-1 loss on Monday night in Houston.Related Articles What A’s winter ball performances can tell us about the second base race Former Oakland A’s lefty Brett Anderson finds new home …last_img

Showing at the Ohio State Fair is about the experience

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseBanners are nice. Success is great. But really, at the end of each Ohio State Fair, it is really about the experience, lessons learned and the people. Though Caroline Winter from Pickaway County has had some success in showmanship and breed shows, those are not the first things she shares about what she loves about the Ohio State Fair.“I have been showing since I could walk. I love hanging out with my friends who are also my competitors,” the 17-year-old said. “In the show ring we compete, but if my friend beats me, I don’t hold it against them. Whatever happens in the show ring, we go get ice cream or play a game of cards — a very competitive game of cards.“Spoons is my favorite card game at the State Fair. We’ll get a big game going and it is a lot of fun. And, for the ice cream, you have to go at the right time because if you don’t the line is wrapping around the building. I go after I show to get a nice treat, cool off and look at the butter cow.”The fun at the Ohio State Fair is the culmination of months of long hours and dedication — something many fairgoers do not always understand.“I love how there are all sorts of different people with all sorts of different backgrounds who come to watch the show. They ask questions and I love talking with them about the cattle,” Caroline said. “A lot of people look forward to seeing the animals and learning about them. I love to talk about the daily care that goes into the animals and what it takes to show them and how much food they actually eat. It is fun talking to them about the animals. I like explaining what I do and why I do it. And yes, they do poop and I do have to clean it up.”This year Caroline (with some help from her older sister Christina) will have three Angus heifers, a Shorthorn cow calf pair, a Shorthorn calf, an Angus steer, a ShorthornPlus steer, and a Maintainer steer at the Ohio State Fair. Many hours go into the care of the cattle leading up to the State Fair but Caroline also has a long set of duties on her family’s crop farm and she trains for fall cross-country in her spare time.“In the mornings in the summer I start with feeding the cattle and getting them in the barn. We rinse every day. When my dad gets home we help with hay, planting, working ground, and harvesting in the fall,” she said. “In the winter we clean the barn and feed a lot of hay. We have a corn-wheat-soybean rotation with another 80 acres of hay — small square bales and big round bales. I help with hay all summer and I am always working with the cattle.”There is plenty of work to be done with the cattle while they are at the State Fair, but in comparison to the normal summer schedule for Caroline, the event is like a vacation.“With the breeding show during the first part of the State Fair, we are in and out so quickly there is not much extra time. But I like the people there, especially in the Shorthorn Breeders Association. They are so nice and friendly. They love their card games and they give out popsicles,” Caroline said. “With the market show later in the Fair, I only have three animals so I can relax a little more. When we are up at the State Fair with the market steers, it is like a vacation away from home and I am able to hang out with my friends and relax. There is way less to take care of compared to the Pickaway County Fair where I had two market steers, a feeder calf, two market lambs, a breeding ewe, and a market hog. Then I went right from county fair to the Shorthorn Junior Nationals in Tennessee. At the county fair or when I’m at home, I have something going on every day.”Of all the species Caroline shows, the cattle are her favorite, which makes her State Fair experience even more special.“With the sheep or pigs, I only have a few months with them. With the cattle, I am working with them year round. You can really see the difference with them starting to trust you and you get this bond with them as they get used to you. Nugget is my Shorthorn cow I’m taking to State Fair. We have gone to many shows together,” Caroline said. “We did the BEST program and other state fairs. Before she had her baby we’d go out here in the lot and play tag. I’d sprint through the pasture and she’d run after me. In the stalls at shows I lay down beside her with my back at the front of the stall and she will lay her head right on me.”Her favorite part of competing with the cattle is showmanship.“I like showmanship. It doesn’t matter how good your animal is,” she said. “It is about how well you can present your animal. The judge is mainly focused on you and I like to show how well I can present my animal.”Caroline will have the unique opportunity to share her showmanship expertise and excitement for the fair this year as a part of the inaugural Dean’s Charity Steer Show on July 30 at 2:00 p.m. in the Voinovich Building. For the event, celebrity exhibitors — including some who never set foot in a show ring — will be paired with Ohio 4-H members to try their hand at showing a steer and vying for the judge’s eye. Donors can support each celebrity involved and proceeds go to the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Ohio.Caroline will be assisting Matt Barnes, a Columbus News anchor for NBC4 Today, as he makes his initial trip into the show ring to wrangle a steer.“Bill Tom from the Ohio State Fair came to me and asked if I wanted to do this at Beef Expo because I have exhibited for so long. I wanted to do this to return the favor of everyone who has helped me. And I know it is going to a really good cause. I actually know some families who have used the Ronald McDonald House. And it sounded fun,” Caroline said. “I always like teaching people about showing cattle and this gives me another chance to do that. Matt Barnes came down to our county fair to watch me get the steers ready for the show and then watched me show them. He asked some questions about the steers and did a short interview. He has no background with steers. I told him, you have to just relax.Columbus morning television anchorman Matt Barnes came to the Winter farm to practice his showmanship skills before the Dean’s Charity Steer Show. Photo provided by the Winter family.“If you get worked up, the steer will get worked up, so you have to be comfortable with them. Once he gets comfortable we’ll lead the steer around some and get the feet set a few times to practice. Then we’ll work on some more of the details. Matt seems pretty excited about it. He asked me if I’ve ever taught someone in one day before. I think he seems very willing to try. If he tries and gives his best effort then he will do pretty well.”Caroline is really looking forward to the event and the Ohio State Fair as a whole. She is hoping to celebrate some State Fair success with some cold, chocolate ice cream from the dairy building. And, like every exhibitor at the fair, she would love a new banner to hang in the barn, but Caroline knows the experience, lessons learned and the people make every year a success at the Ohio State Fair no matter what the outcome in the show ring.To find out more about the Dean’s Charity Steer Show and make a donation today at cfaes.osu.edu/deanscharitysteershow.Long months of hard work are an important part of taking competitive cattle to show at the Ohio State Fair.last_img read more

Doctrines of Jainism particularly relevant in today’s world: President

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WC: Harbhajan returns home to Jalandhar

Pikeville Walmart Has An Incredible Kentucky 36-0 Soda Display

first_imgPikeville Walmart's amazing Kentucky 36-0 soda display.The Kentucky Wildcats are the first 36-0 team in college basketball history, and everyone in the state – including one grocery store owner – is trying to get in on the action. The Pikeville Walmart apparently has an incredible Kentucky soda display, complete with the team’s record. In the below photo, taken by a Wildcats fan named Brian Daniels, UK’s logo is made out of Sprite Zero cases, while the W/L columns are made out of Coke Zero cases. Diet Coke cases provide the backdrop. It’s well done.Pikeville Walmart yesterday! @ACassady_KSR @KySportsRadio pic.twitter.com/uwzopMhX6W— Brian Daniels (@bdanie01) March 22, 2015Kentucky will take on the winner of Maryland vs. West Virginia next week in the Sweet 16.last_img

Video: Watch This Sneak Preview Of Ohio State’s “Scarlet and Gray Days” Big Ten Network Show

first_imgUrban Meyer talks to a group of players.Ohio State Scarlet and Gray DaysUpdate: We’ve got another Scarlet and Gray Days preview to show you. This one features Braxton Miller, wide receiver. Like what you see, @OhioStAthletics fans? Don’t miss “Scarlet & Gray Days” at 7 p.m. ET Wednesday. #InsideOSU http://t.co/CYarPB7qKE— Big Ten Network (@BigTenNetwork) August 18, 2015Earlier: The Ohio State football program is the subject of a new Big Ten Network show that’s focusing on the Buckeyes’ 2015 training camp. The show, Scarlet and Gray Days, is set to debut Wednesday at 7 p.m. E.T. on BTN. Thanks to Land Grant Holy Land, we’ve gotten a sneak peek at one of the scenes from the first show. In this scene, Urban Meyer is addressing his players. “We will not go into Game 1 in Blacksburg, Va., not nine strong,” he says. Urban Meyer: “We will not go into Game 1 in Blacksburg, VA not ‘nine strong’ … That’s absolutely not negotiable.” http://t.co/y39urFk7T6— Land-Grant Holy Land (@Landgrant33) August 17, 2015Ready for the fall, Buckeye fans? Ohio State opens its season Sept. 7 against Virginia Tech at 8 p.m. E.T. The game will be televised on ESPN.last_img read more

Usain Bolt Makes Donations To Cancer Charity

Usain Bolt is known for his lightening speed and gold medals, but very rarely is he recognized for his charitable donations to the community; thus, Bolt has made to two big contributions to the British community.He donated a pair of autographed running spikes to nine-year-old Matthew Smith, who is a cancer victim that had to have his leg amputated in April.  Smith is currently learning adjusting to using a prosthetic limb, which he is hopeful that the limb will allow him to return the soccer field and play for Brislington Juniors FC in Bristol.The Olympic champion in the 100 and 200 meters, heard about Smith’s situation from his cousin Vinette Jones.  Jones with Smith’s soccer coach.“I think the story really struck a chord with him,” Jones said.  “Usain is a very quick runner so he thought about what it would like for him to lose a leg.”Bolt’s mother, Jennifer, presented the signed spikes to the family before flying to Jamaica after the London Olympics.The Smith family was shocked and thankful for Bolt’s gratitude.“Having Usain Bolt’s mum come and present Matthew with a signed pair of his spikes was brilliant,” said his father, Colin.  “Matthew really appreciated it and couldn’t believe that one of the biggest superstars in the world had done that for him.”The family has placed the shoes on eBay and hope to raise $1,300 to help go towards medical expenses.Bolt did not just stop his charitable ways with the Smith family, but he recently helped out Great Britain’s Mel Edwards.Edwards, 69, was a reserve for the Great Britain marathon team in 1968 Mexico Olympic Games, was diagnosed six years ago with multiple myeloma and bone marrow cancer.Edwards was able to get Bolt to autograph one of his Jamaican international running tops for his cancer charity. He understands how rare of an opportunity this for his charity.“He only signs three or four vests each year for charitable purposes so I am delighted he has decided to choose my charity,” Edwards said.The top will be auctioned off on Nov. 8 at London’s Dorchester Hotel at a gala dinner for Myeloma UK charity. read more

Keita BatesDiop providing spark off the bench for Ohio State mens basketball

Freshman forward Keita Bates-Diop drives toward the basket during a game against Penn State on Feb. 11 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 75-55. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead / Lantern photographerWhile the Ohio State men’s basketball team has seen its share of production from familiar names such as freshman guard D’Angelo Russell and senior forward Sam Thompson, it’s been the play of a young forward that is starting to get the attention of coaches.And not just his own.Freshman Keita Bates-Diop has scored more than a fifth of his points this season in the last two games for the Buckeyes, both wins for OSU.Bates-Diop had a career night with 14 points, while adding nine boards and three assists, in a 79-60 thrashing of Rutgers on Sunday.He followed that up with a seven-point, five-rebound performance in a 75-55 win against Penn State Wednesday night, and Nittany Lion coach Pat Chambers said he was not surprised by it.“He played really well against Rutgers. He knocked down some shots for them so he gives them another outside threat,” Chambers said after the game. “He’s long, he’s athletic and he’s rangy so he’s going to be a really good player for years to come. But he gives you another guy you have to worry about out there other than No. 0.”No. 0 is Russell, who said after the game that when players like Bates-Diop perform well, it makes it simpler for him and for the team to succeed.“Teams can’t really key on me if other guys are stepping up and doing what they’re good at,” Russell said. “It makes the game a lot easier for me.”Bates-Diop has been seeing increased minutes since the temporary departure of sophomore forward Marc Loving, who has missed the last three games with a suspension for an undisclosed reason. OSU coach Thad Matta said he expects Loving to return to action in the Buckeyes’ next game against the Michigan State Spartans, but added that Bates-Diop has earned more minutes with his recent play.“I think from the standpoint of how Keita has played, I am just so excited for him. This is kind of what we’ve been trying to get out of him just in terms of his aggressiveness,” Matta said. “He’s long, he can block shots he can rebound out of his area. I don’t think he shot the ball particularly well tonight (against Penn State), but we know he can do that and really stretch a defense.”Bates-Diop’s offensive game might not have been put on full display against the Nittany Lions, but the Normal, Ill., native shot 4-of-7 from the field against Rutgers, including 3-of-4 from long range.However, it isn’t just Bates-Diop’s offensive game that Matta has been pleased with. Matta added after the win over Penn State that Bates-Diop is starting to learn his role on defense better and it was evident Wednesday as he finished the night with three blocks and two steals.“He is learning how to use his length,” Matta said of the 6-foot-7-inch freshman. “He made a couple rotations defensively tonight that I think kind of solidified he understands what’s going on out there now.”Thompson, who scored a career-high 22 points in Wednesday’s win, said Bates-Diop will be key for the Buckeyes moving forward as the regular season winds down.“Keita’s been huge. He has been asked to step up, and in the last few games he has really answered the call,” Thompson said. “He has made shots, he has been aggressive offensively and defensively. We need Keita to keep that going.”Bates-Diop and the Buckeyes will look to do just that as they are set to take on the Michigan State Spartans on Saturday in East Lansing, Mich. Tip-off is scheduled for noon. read more

Football Ohio State lands 2018 fourstar Toledo linebacker Dallas Gant

Ohio State reeled in its 10th member of its 2018 football recruiting class when four-star linebacker Dallas Gant announced his commitment to the Buckeyes Tuesday afternoon at St. John’s Jesuit High School in Toledo, Ohio.Gant is the 126th-best prospect in the country, according to 247Sports. He is rated as the fourth-best player in the state of Ohio and the fifth-best at his position in the country. Gant is the second-lowest ranked prospect of OSU’s ten commits, according to the recruiting service.The Toledo native is the first of his position in his class to commit to OSU. He is the second in-state prospect to commit to the Buckeyes, following running back Jaelen Gill, a Westerville, Ohio native.OSU’s 2018 class is led by two five-star prospects, quarterback Emory Jones and defensive tackle Taron Vincent. Cmmitted pic.twitter.com/06R86sDhc1— Dallas Gant (@dallas_gant) May 16, 2017 read more

Football Wide receiver Cameron Brown signs with Ohio State

Ohio State picked up only its second wide receiver commitment of its 2018 class after Cameron Brown announced he had faxed in his letter of intent with the Buckeyes Wednesday afternoon.The four-star wide receiver had previously been committed to Nebraska, but flipped his commitment on Early Signing Day. He joins Kamryn Babb as the only wide receiver in Ohio State’s class, though L’Christian Smith is likely to become a wide receiver despite being listed as an athlete.The St. Louis native is ranked as the No. 339 recruit in the nation according to the 247Sports composite rankings. The rankings aggregator also has him pegged as the No. 58 recruit at his position and No. 6 in the state of Missouri.

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