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Eric “Benny” Bloom Tells Us What It Means To Be A Part Of The Shady Horns

first_imgThere’s no rest for Eric “Benny” Bloom these days, not when the lure of the stage is calling. Just last week alone, he and partner in The Shady Horns, saxophonist Ryan Zoidis, have appeared on The Today Show backing up the legendary Aaron Neville, brought some punch to a pair of shows with Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh before heading out to rehearsals for the upcoming Lettuce tour.Adding to his manic workload are special appearances at the Bear Creek Bayou Festival, the Catskill Chill Music Festival and the dream team laden Brooklyn Comes Alive festival. Somehow, in the midst of all his comings and goings, Bloom managed to squeeze in a conversation with our own Rex Thomson about the joy of having a musical partner, how to play in any circumstance and what funk music means to him.L4LM: As a part of The Shady Horns you have shared the stage with legends and the cream of the music scene, as well as your partner-in-crime, Ryan Zoidis. Can you give us a rundown on how you came to be “Shady?”Eric “Benny” Bloom: The Shady Horns originally started as the horn section for Soulive with Sam Kininger. When I joined Lettuce, it was Ryan Zoidis, me and James Casey; we were The Shady Horns. Then James left to do stuff with Trey and other artists, so we carried the flame, continued on, and now here we are… Zoidis and me: a duo.It’s great. It’s concise. It’s easy. Ryan and I work really well together and we think alike, musically. I’ve never really had such a long connection. He’s the man.L4LM: How in tune with your partner are you? Do you feel like you know where Zoidis is going in a jam, or is he still surprising you after all these years?EBB: Oh, of course, you’re always getting surprised. We can come up with a horn line, a little lick, in the moment and play it the next time around. We’re on the same page. Sometimes I’ll just play the harmony, which is something people might not catch the first couple times through, but he gets it and plays around me.We do a lot of jamming, and out of that there are variations to be played. A lot of times we’ll guess the same variations. We’re pretty in tune. That’s why nobody plays or sounds like us. We come in to work with an artist and we can figure anything out.Before we played with him, Phil Lesh asked us, “Hey, you got something for ‘Sugaree?’,” and I was like “Yep!” And we didn’t have anything. But when it went down, I came up with a line, Ryan came up with a line, and I came up with another line, and it came out great. That’s the way to do it. Right then. Old school.L4LM: Is there any cool inside stuff about playing with Phil that you feel like sharing?EBB: When we were about to play, we all got in a circle, put one foot in and just made crazy sounds for a minute or two. It was to open yourself up, and it was really cool. Instead of just being in your own head-space, everyone got loose and connected.He has so many things he has been through, experienced with the Dead. His methods are obviously tried and true. So if he suggests something, I listen.L4LM: The Shady Horns just had a huge television appearance backing up Aaron Neville on The Today Show. As a musician you keep late nights, but the show happens early in the morning. Did you just stay up and play through, or did you get some sleep first?EBB: I’m not 21 anymore… I can’t play through anymore. I mean… I can, but when you’re on TV, you can’t be screwing up. I tried to sleep, but of course, you can’t really can’t be screwing up. But I’ve been on The Today Show before, so I knew what to expect.L4LM: For some folks, being on The Today Show would be the highlight of their year, but with the madness of your life it might not even be the high point of the WEEK. How was that transition, going from Neville to Lesh, stylistically?EBB: You don’t really think of it. You just take every day as a new day and a new gig, y’know? I listened to plenty of the Grateful Dead and Phish coming up, and I know if those kinds of bands have horns, it sounds like The Moody Blues, or Chicago or Blood, Sweat & Tears. That is what a horn section sounded like around the time of the Grateful Dead music.But with Aaron Neville, he wanted a New Orleans styled horn section. Guys who used to play with Fats Domino and Allen Toussaint, old school guys like that. So you need to know that music too. Whatever gig you agree to do, you should know as much as you can about that. That way when you get there, it’s not about making some big transition.It’s like cooking. You can say “Hey! I’m cooking French food today.” And some people specialize, sure, but if you need to cook Mexican it shouldn’t be that difficult if you know what you’re doing.L4LM: Do you see funk as a specific style of music or a vibe that can be applied to any music situation?EBB: Yeah, I don’t think it’s a genre, really. I mean, it helps some people to have labels, but I hate them. For example, Aaron Neville was really one of the first rhythm and blues singers. R&B just kinda morphed into rock and roll. Funk was always more based in the blues side. The funk… you can look at it as a sound, a way of playing.You look at James Brown. He’s the king of funk, The Godfather of soul. He had Maceo Parker and Fred Wesley who both really wanted to be jazz musicians. And they got into what was really, in a way, a pop band to them. Really, when you look at it, all that funk is really blues and jazz based.L4LM: You’ve made your home in New Orleans for a while now. Do you manage to get any rest when you are off the road, or is the temptation of gigging with your own band and sitting in around town too much for you?EBB: It’s really difficult. Like tomorrow, I am flying home to play my last gig with my band, Sonic Bloom, before I fly out the next day for Lettuce rehearsals. So as much as I want to rest I want to keep my flame burning in New Orleans as much as I can.There is so much good stuff down there that you just want to go all the time. And so many places, like Preservation Hall, where I have friends now I can go and do that. Not many people get an opportunity like that and I definitely try and make the most of it.I make time for playing when I should make more time for myself. More Netflix and my girlfriend Lisa, but… what are you gonna do?L4LM: Speaking of Lettuce and playing shows at home, you and your friends are helping to celebrate the rebirth of the Bear Creek Music Festival, now held on the Bayou in New Orleans. Lettuce has put on some spectacular shows at Bear Creek in the past… how excited are you guys to be such a big part of the return?EBB: I love the crew that does the Bear Creek Festival, Lyle and Judy. I’m looking forward to it. I’m really looking forward to it because, for me, I live here. I love it. It’s like the fest is coming home.This is gonna be like a mini-Jazz Fest. It’s perfect. It’s in the fall, and gives New Orleans a taste of Jazz Fest but at this time of the year. Just the good old Bear Creek vibe, but in New Orleans. It’s gonna be amazing.Besides the Lettuce sets, I am doing another set with a lot of horn players. That’s gonna be really strong.L4LM: Your special set was a nice addition to the line up. Can you tell us a little bit about that, like how many horn players you plan on cramming on the stage?EBB: It’s Natalie Cressman, Jennifer Hartswick, Skerik and me. Only four total. That’s enough. And we’ve got a strong contingent of local talent. That’s the thing about doing it in New Orleans is that you have so much talent you can tap. My friend Josh Starkman, Thomas Glass, a young, like 19 year old drummer. Joe Ashlar the great organist and Noah Young, the bass player from Naughty Professor. It’s a nice band. They’re happening.L4LM: It’s nice to see you bringing in fresh faces.EBB: That’s the way it is supposed to be. It’s the way it HAS to be. You have to keep it fresh. It’s like… I’m playing with Phil Lesh after how many years has he been playing? Always gotta keep it like that.L4LM: You’re also participating in one of the official after parties, a tribute to Bernie Worrell. (More info/tickets here). With the Louisiana tradition of celebrating loss with revelry it seems like a perfect place for that kind of show.EBB: Yeah, it’s a great place to do it. And we have a lot of Dumpstaphunk crew in there, and they’re so influenced by P-Funk. The band that they have chosen to do it is perfect for the material, and I don’t that much of a chance to do a lot of P-Funk music.P-Funk stuff has a lot of horns and a lot of vocals, and I’m looking forward that a lot. Like I said, the band is great and the music will sound right and funky.L4LM: You’re involved in some amazing tributes to a few of the music greats we’ve lost in the coming weeks, from Bernie Worrell, Maurice White to the legendary Miles Davis. Do you think it’s important to work to keep the music of the fallen greats alive?EBB: I think it’s very important. I don’t do to many of these tributes but I think it’s very important. People know such a small amount of the work of these artists. Take Miles Davis. There’s so much great Miles Davis out there. If I can reawaken the awareness of Miles in some people then maybe they’ll dig into his catalog.That’s what I wish people were doing now-a-days, getting deeper into their favorite artists. People like Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, Louis Armstrong… dig deeper into their catalog. Get to understand an artist. Get to understand why they left space here, or finessed something there.I get called for a lot of these tributes, but I try and only do the ones that are a bit different, that go deeper into the artist they are honoring.L4LM: You’ve got what is essentially Break Science and your Lettuce bandmates backing you on this journey through the classic Davis album Bitches Brew. Are you going to be doing the whole album?EBB: We’re going to get in a good amount, but it’s a chance to expose people to that period of Miles, to really channel it. And because I play with the Lettuce and Break Science guys so much, they’re perfect for that era Miles.I mean Jesus (Coomes) is perfect for that, he knows that music really well. Everyone in that band knows that music. Sure, I would love to play with some other guys sometimes, because I get to play with these guys all the time, but they’re right for the job and you can’t knock that.L4LM: Was Miles a big influence on your development as a player?EBB: Oh yeah. I mean, a lot of people are in there for me, but definitely Miles. Birth Of The Cool. I have almost every one of his albums. Every trumpet player is influenced by Miles. Every musician, really, whether they know it or not.I’m definitely a huge Miles fan and very happy to be doing this tribute.L4LM: Later in October you are heading back to your old stomping grounds, New York City, to be part of the all super group festival Brooklyn Comes Alive. What do you think of the cavalcade of stars approach the organizers have taken?EBB: I think it’s great. I love so many of those people! I’m doing an amazing set with the Coomes brothers, Jesus and Tycoon and The Shady Horns. Ty writes a lot of amazing stuff and it is gonna be an amazing day of music. Kunj Shah did a great job of putting it together.L4LM: One of the most talked about Jazz Fest late night shows was the Earth, Wind & Fire tribute hosted by The Nth Power. By popular demand it is making its return at Brooklyn Comes Alive. Any hints you can give us about how you’re planning to take this to the next level?EBB: There’s just so much of their music that you can do, that is all so good, that it’s easy to switch it up and make it different. There’s never a bad time to listen to Earth, Wind & Fire. I listen to them once a day, at least.L4LM: And while all this is going on you’re going to be out on tour?EBB: Yeah, we take off on the Sounds Like A Party tour next week. We’re gonna go see as many of our fans as we can. I’m just trying to live every day the best I can and get better as I go. Wish me luck!L4LM: Good luck! Well, thank you for fitting this chat into your busy schedule. We’re looking forward to seeing the magic you’re gonna be making.EBB: Thanks for having me. You guys are the best. Tickets for Lettuce’s Sounds Like A Party tour available HERETickets for the Bear Creek Bayou are available HERETickets for the All Star Tribute To Bernie Worrell are available HERETickets for the Catskill Chill are available HERETickets for the all-star Brooklyn Comes Alive are available HERElast_img read more

A Tweed Heads home is an entertainers dream with two pools

first_img13 The Mainbrace Tweed Heads“It has a nice contemporary feel about it and you can still fit 10 family members around the dinner table every night,” Mr McEwan said. “I was really attracted to the two pools when we found the house.“We use the lap pool for fitness and the other one for relaxing and parties.”More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North11 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoThe boss of Gold Coast air conditioning business Complete Air Supply said he needed a house to keep him cool. 13 The Mainbrace Tweed HeadsA STONES throw from the beach this impressive entertainer’s home has not one, but two swimming pools.Owners Steve and Liz McEwan, who bought the property in 2008, said it had been a great family home for their four kids. 13 The Mainbrace Tweed Heads“The home was really functional for our family because the kids had their partners stay and we all had our own space,” he said. “The boys and I spent hours and hours in the snooker room playing pool.” The room includes a sports bar with a kitchen and breakfast bar which overlook she resort style pool. Other features include a grand timber staircase and granite floors while the main ensuite has a private balcony, spa and two basins.center_img 13 The Mainbrace Tweed Heads“Having a pool was a must, having two was just a bonus,” the father-of-four said.The five-bedroom home has waterfront views that are captured throughout the home. Large double timber doors and high ceilings create a luxurious entry while an open floor plan and dual-living spaces channel a family style. The two-storey home has one ensuited bedroom downstairs.last_img read more

Watch these ticklish rats laugh and jump for joy

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe For the ticklish among us, just the approach of wiggling fingers is enough to elicit squeals, if not screams. And it turns out we’re not the only ones. Now, a study in rats pinpoints the “tickle center” of the mammalian brain, showing for the first time that stimulating neurons in that region can elicit a paroxysm of ultrasonic squeaks, the rat version of human laughter.Scientists have puzzled over the mysteries of tickling for millennia, with Aristotle famously asking why most people can’t tickle themselves. There are important neurological and psychological reasons to study tickling: One telltale symptom of schizophrenia, for example, is that people can tickle themselves. Tickling is also linked to our ability to laugh, play, and feel good, notes Shimpei Ishiyama, a neuroscientist at the Humboldt University of Berlin. “Neuroscientists are so obsessed with deficits such as depression and anxiety, it’s rare to find papers about positive emotions,” he says.Previous studies of tickling in people reveal a mosaic of brain regions that orchestrate the tickle response. One of these regions, the somatosensory cortex, was thought to merely process the sensation of being tickled, but not trigger the laughter that follows. The new work, published today in Science, “shows for the first time that laughter can be elicited by stimulation” in that region, rather than through traditional emotional circuitry, says Elise Wattendorf, a neuroscientist at the University of Fribourg in Germany who was not involved in the research. Rats weren’t always thought to be the chortling sort, but now a large body of literature backs up that they serve as a good model for tickling in people. “Although it was a very bold idea in the beginning, experiments show that rats are enjoying it,” Ishiyama says. Other studies suggest that the ultrasonic squeaks they make are expressions of pleasure. Not only do rats return over and over again to the place they were tickled, the handling triggers the neurotransmitter dopamine in key reward-related brain circuits in the rodents, he says. Best of all, rats display a classic expression of positive emotion, found across many species, including dogs, foxes, lambs, guinea pigs, and human children, called “joy jumps,” Ishiyama says. This involves leaping into the air with both legs together, he explains.To tickle a rat effectively takes some practice, but Ishiyama is an expert. Starting with juvenile male rats, which tend to be most playful, he spends a week or two letting them get used to being tickled on the back and belly. “It’s pretty much like if you tickle kids or dogs or cats,” he says. Over time, the rats learn it is fun to play with this big hand, and they start chasing it and even recognizing it as a playmate, he says.Once the animals were trained, the scientists inserted electrodes into their somatosensory cortex to record neural activity during tickling. Surprisingly, the cells increased their firing rates not only in response to the physical stimulus of being tickled, but also after, as the rodent chased the hand and “giggled.” That contradicts the traditional idea that the somatosensory cortex only processes sensory information, not triggers other behaviors, Ishiyama says.Even more surprising was what happened next: When the research team applied a small amount of electrical current to the same cells, the stimulation caused the rats to vocalize in the same playful way they had while being tickled and chasing the hand, the team reports. “This is very important, clear evidence that the activity of those cells is responsible for ticklishness,” Ishiyama says.One of the fascinating things about ticklishness is that it is so mood-dependent, Ishiyama says. “Even Darwin observed that children tickled by a stranger would rather scream than laugh.” To determine whether rats, too, are less ticklish when they are anxious, the researchers put them on an elevated platform and exposed the nocturnal animals to a bright light. The rats were distinctly less ticklish, and their brain activity showed a suppression of the cells that had fired so enthusiastically in the previous experiment, even when they were stimulated with the electrodes, he says.The results suggests that hard-wired connections must form early in life between somatosensory cortical neurons and cells in other brain regions that process other aspects of tickling, from the motor neurons that trigger laughter to the socially attuned neurons that recognize whether a tickler is a friend or stranger, Wattendorf says. The study “constitutes an outstanding result,” she says.That early development fits well with other observations: If rats and people aren’t tickled when they are young, they tend not to enjoy it as adults. That may explain another observation. Despite devoting much of his career to tickling rats, Ishiyama himself despises being tickled. 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