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Galaxy Clusters Reveal New Dark Matter Insights

first_img Business News Make a comment More Cool Stuff Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News Subscribe Herbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyKim To File For Divorce From Kanye West After 6 Years Of MarriageHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Brutally Honest Reasons Why You’re Still SingleHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeauty Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Galaxy Clusters Reveal New Dark Matter InsightsDark matter is a mysterious cosmic phenomenon that accounts for 27 percent of all matter and energy. Though dark matter is all around us, we cannot see it or feel it. But scientists can infer the presence of dark matter by looking at how normal matter behaves around it.Galaxy clusters, which consist of thousands of galaxies, are important for exploring dark matter because they reside in a region where such matter is much denser than average. Scientists believe that the heavier a cluster is, the more dark matter it has in its environment. But new research suggests the connection is more complicated than that.“Galaxy clusters are like the large cities of our universe. In the same way that you can look at the lights of a city at night from a plane and infer its size, these clusters give us a sense of the distribution of the dark matter that we can’t see,” said Hironao Miyatake at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena.A new study in Physical Review Letters, led by Miyatake, suggests that the internal structure of a galaxy cluster is linked to the dark matter environment surrounding it. This is the first time that a property besides the mass of a cluster has been shown to be associated with surrounding dark matter.Researchers studied approximately 9,000 galaxy clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR8 galaxy catalog, and divided them into two groups by their internal structures: one in which the individual galaxies within clusters were more spread out, and one in which they were closely packed together. The scientists used a technique called gravitational lensing — looking at how the gravity of clusters bends light from other objects — to confirm that both groups had similar masses.But when the researchers compared the two groups, they found an important difference in the distribution of galaxy clusters. Normally, galaxy clusters are separated from other clusters by 100 million light-years on average. But for the group of clusters with closely packed galaxies, there were fewer neighboring clusters at this distance than for the sparser clusters. In other words, the surrounding dark-matter environment determines how packed a cluster is with galaxies.“This difference is a result of the different dark-matter environments in which the groups of clusters formed. Our results indicate that the connection between a galaxy cluster and surrounding dark matter is not characterized solely by cluster mass, but also its formation history,” Miyatake said.Study co-author David Spergel, professor of astronomy at Princeton University in New Jersey, added, “Previous observational studies had shown that the cluster’s mass is the most important factor in determining its global properties. Our work has shown that ‘age matters’: Younger clusters live in different large-scale dark-matter environments than older clusters.”The results are in line with predictions from the leading theory about the origins of our universe. After an event called cosmic inflation, a period of less than a trillionth of a second after the big bang, there were small changes in the energy of space called quantum fluctuations. These changes then triggered a non-uniform distribution of matter. Scientists say the galaxy clusters we see today have resulted from fluctuations in the density of matter in the early universe.“The connection between the internal structure of galaxy clusters and the distribution of surrounding dark matter is a consequence of the nature of the initial density fluctuations established before the universe was even one second old,” Miyatake said.Researchers will continue to explore these connections.“Galaxy clusters are remarkable windows into the mysteries of the universe. By studying them, we can learn more about the evolution of large-scale structure of the universe, and its early history, as well as dark matter and dark energy,” Miyatake said. Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy center_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Science and Technology Galaxy Clusters Reveal New Dark Matter Insights From STAFF REPORTS Published on Monday, January 25, 2016 | 11:28 am 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Top of the News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

SMC holds bonfire to celebrate ‘every form’ of diversity

first_imgA bonfire held by the Student Diversity Board (SDB) at Saint Mary’s will celebrate cultural diversity and raise money for victims affected by recent storms in Mexico. The bonfire will take place Wednesday from 8 to 10 p.m. on the soccer fields. Sophomore Vanessa Troglia, SDB member and event coordinator, said music and food will be key parts of the event, “Students can expect great music and performances from different clubs and associations around our community,” Troglia said. “There will also be yummy fall treats to munch on by the bonfires and various activities for everyone to participate in. We invite students to come take a study break and enjoy the crisp, fall evening by the fire.” Senior Carmen Cardenas, SDB president, said the board’s mission is to “unite the Saint Mary’s College community in celebration of the cultural diversity of every woman on campus.”  Junior SDB member Taylor Etzell said she hopes students will bond at the bonfire.   “The [bonfire] will be a fun event where students can come together to enjoy the talents and experiences of diverse students on our campus and in our community,” Etzell said. “The bonfire highlights that diversity comes from more avenues than just ethnicity; it comes in every form of our human behavior.” Cardenas said the bonfire will provide fall foods in addition to live entertainment by Troop ND, Bella Acapella, Irish Dance, Saint Mary’s Dance, La Republica and St. Aldaberts Ballet Folklorico. Cultural clubs will also attend the event, including the Chinese club, Korean club, Sisters of Nefertiti, La Fuerza and other organizations. “What is really amazing this year is that we will have two different performances done by international students,” she said. “Yaqi Song will be playing live traditional Chinese background music and Liangiun Wang will be dancing to music.” A unique addition to this year’s event is a humanitarian relief fund for the people affected by the recent storms in Mexico, Hurricanes Ingrid and Manuel. Troglia said there will be a raffle and a donations table for this year’s Mexico fund. “Recently deadly floods have devastated a large population in Mexico. With the help of our community, we can raise awareness for this cause and give aid and resources to some affected victims,” she said. “We feel that it is important to help people within our community as well as others around the world. After all, that’s what the celebration of diversity is about.” SDB hopes to raise awareness of the plights of the Mexican victims of recent natural disasters, and to mobilize support on campus, Cardenas said.        “The devastation caused by the storms in Mexico has left the region of Tierra Caliente, inSsouthern Mexico, in a deep humanitarian crisis,” Cardenas said. “People from Altamirano City and Coyuca de Catalan have lost everything due to the floods. Their entire communities are now gone. Some of the victims have been left without communication, food, or water. “Urban areas have received government relief, however, Tierra Caliente, a marginalized region plagued with extreme poverty, has not received any aid from local, state or federal authorities. “ SDB is working with local community members at this year’sBbonfire to join forces and help those who have been impactedd Cardenas said. The donation table will be collecting money to buy items such as bottled water, canned foods, rice, crackers, soap, shampoo, baby formula, baby bottle, and diapers. “No amount is too small,” Cardenas said. “Donations will help provide the most basic needs.”  For more information on the relief fund sponsored at this event, visit https://www.giveforward.com/fundraiser/cz33/tierra-caliente-emergency-relief-fun. Contact Samantha Grady at [email protected]last_img read more

Saint Mary’s adapts visitor guidelines after 2-week restrictions

first_imgInterim vice president of student affairs Gloria Roldán Jenkins informed students that the College would be returning to visitor guidelines established at the beginning of the semester, in an email sent to students Thursday.Jenkins said that tri-campus students will now be allowed to come to Saint Mary’s when given permission by their home institution. She also reminded Belles to continue following health and safety guidelines across campuses.“Tri-campus students are not considered visitors and can come to Saint Mary’s campus,” Jenkins said. “However, all social visitors from Notre Dame or Holy Cross, when allowed by their respective institutions, must follow Saint Mary’s safety guidelines, including wearing an appropriate face covering, physical distancing and hand washing. Saint Mary’s students visiting Notre Dame must adhere to their guidelines and standards. Holy Cross remains closed to outside visitors.”Currently, off-campus visitors are still cautioned not to come to the College unless they have necessary business to complete.“Saint Mary’s College continues to discourage off-campus visitors,” Jenkins said. “Only those with essential business with the College are allowed at this time.”Jenkins also told students that no visitors are allowed in private dorm spaces. On-campus Saint Mary’s students can still visit each other’s rooms while following proper safety guidelines.“No guests, including family members, students from Notre Dame and Holy Cross, or Saint Mary’s students who are living off-campus, are allowed in private residence hall spaces,” Jenkins said. “Each residence hall has a designated lobby where guests may wait, but they must wear a mask at all times. Saint Mary’s students living on campus are allowed to visit one another in their residence halls, but must wear a mask at all times.”The College is still limiting informal social gatherings to 15 people and is requiring clubs to receive approval to plan events.“To minimize students’ exposure to COVID-19, informal social gatherings will continue to be limited to 15 people,” Jenkins said. “Students and other community members may request to organize internal events, as long as they follow participant, physical distancing and masking guidelines.”Belles can also participate in activities approved across the tri-campus, a policy which is subject to change with the changing health status of the College and the surrounding community.Students are also asked to follow safety guidelines while traveling for the weekend.“While students are not absolutely barred from such travel, we do ask that students who choose to leave campus for the weekend adhere to the safety guidelines established by the College while away,” Jenkins said. “For the same reason, we continue to ask that students refrain from attending off-campus parties.”Tags: COVID-19, fall 2020, Gloria Roldán Jenkins, Saint Mary’s Collegelast_img read more

Muttontown Man Pleads Guilty to Dumping Toxic Chemicals

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Muttontown man will avoid jail time after admitting to illegally dumping toxic chemicals into the ground at his Glen Cove salvage yard near a waterway that feeds the Long Island Sound.John Doxey pleaded guilty Wednesday at Nassau County court to endangering public health, safety or the environment.Prosecutors said the 45-year-old man illegally released toxic automotive fluids into the ground of his salvage yard on Park Place, just south of the Glen Cove waterway.New York State law requires that fluids like gasoline, motor oil and transmission fluid be drained and property stored for disposal before disassembling vehicles.Doxey was arrested in May 2012 following a joint investigation by Glen Cove city police, Nassau County police, the state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and county prosecutors.Judge Francis Ricigliano sentenced Doxey to a conditional discharge with an agreement that he will finish the clean-up of the property under the supervision of the DEC. He has already spent $25,000 on the clean-up.last_img read more

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